Alec Baldwin appears in court in parking-spot case

Ethics

Alec Baldwin appeared in a New York court on Monday after being accused of striking a man in the face over a parking space.

The 60-year-old actor said nothing as he was arraigned on misdemeanor and violation-level charges. He has previously stated that he did nothing wrong.

Baldwin was arrested on Nov. 2. Police were told a driver pulled into a Manhattan parking space that one of Baldwin's relatives was holding for him, and the two men started quarreling and pushing each other.

The other driver told police Baldwin punched or slapped him. The 49-year-old man was taken to a hospital complaining of jaw pain and redness around his neck.

"Mr. Baldwin is a public figure whose reputation has been damaged by media reports that claim that he punched a man on a New York City street," said his lawyer, Alan Abramson.

"There is incontrovertible video evidence that has been turned over to the district attorney's office that proves beyond all doubt that Mr. Baldwin never punched anyone," the lawyer said. "Mr. Baldwin did not commit any crime and we are confident that once this matter is fully investigated it will be resolved swiftly and appropriately in court."

"Mr. Baldwin is a public figure whose reputation has been damaged by media reports that claim that he punched a man on a New York City street," said his lawyer, Alan Abramson.

"There is incontrovertible video evidence that has been turned over to the district attorney's office that proves beyond all doubt that Mr. Baldwin never punched anyone," the lawyer said. "Mr. Baldwin did not commit any crime and we are confident that once this matter is fully investigated it will be resolved swiftly and appropriately in court."

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Does a car or truck accident count as a work injury?

If an employee is injured in a car crash while on the job, they are eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits. “On the job” injuries are not limited to accidents and injuries that happen inside the workplace, they may also include injuries suffered away from an employee’s place of work while performing a job-related task, such as making a delivery or traveling to a client meeting.

Regular commutes to and from work don’t usually count. If you get into an accident on your way in on a regular workday, it’s probably not considered a work injury for the purposes of workers’ compensation.

If you drive around as part of your job, an injury on the road or loading/unloading accident is likely a work injury. If you don’t typically drive around for work but are required to drive for the benefit of your employer, that would be a work injury in many cases. If you are out of town for work, pretty much any driving would count as work related. For traveling employees, any accidents or injuries that happen on a work trip, even while not technically working, can be considered a work injury. The reason is because you wouldn’t be in that town in the first place, had you not been on a work trip.

Workers’ compensation claims for truck drivers, traveling employees and work-related injuries that occur away from the job site can be challenging and complex. At Krol, Bongiorno & Given, we understand that many families depend on the income of an injured worker, and we are proud of our record protecting the injured and disabled. We have handled well over 30,000 claims for injured workers throughout the state of Illinois.