Nevada high court gets flurry of filings in execution case

Notable Attorneys

Two drugmakers asked the Nevada Supreme Court on Monday to let a state court judge hear arguments before justices take up an appeal about whether the state can use their products for an execution.

The companies "and the citizens of Nevada have a substantial interest in knowing how the state intends to carry out the process of killing a human being under a death warrant," said Hikma Pharmaceuticals US, a maker of the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl that has been blamed for overdose deaths nationwide.

State attorneys also filed documents ahead of a noon deadline pointing to a federal judge's decision last Friday in Nebraska not to block a scheduled Tuesday execution. The filing was based on what Nevada calls "copy-cat" arguments by a pharmaceutical company objecting to its drug being used in that state.

Nevada justices should follow Senior U.S. District Judge Richard Kopf's reasoning in the Nebraska case, state Deputy Solicitor General Jordan T. Smith said, and allow Nevada to carry out the execution of Scott Raymond Dozier.

"Many people of good faith object to the death penalty," Kopf observed. But he noted that Nebraska voters favor capital punishment, and courts should not frustrate the functioning of a democracy.

Two more filings were made in Nevada after the noon deadline, including drug company Sandoz Inc.'s bid to weigh in to argue against its product being used, and an additional state filing arguing that drug companies shouldn't be allowed to begin a "fishing expedition" for evidence.

The Nevada state high court didn't immediately act or schedule hearings about how to proceed with the prison's effort to set a new date for the twice-postponed lethal injection of the twice-convicted killer. But justices have acted quickly on other recent developments in the case.

Dozier, 47, is not challenging his convictions or sentences for killings in Phoenix and Las Vegas. He insists he wants to die and doesn't really care if it's painful.

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USCIS to Continue Implementing New Policy Memorandum on Notices to Appear

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is continuing to implement the June 28, 2018, Policy Memorandum (PM), Updated Guidance for the Referral of Cases and Issuance of Notices to Appear (NTAs) in Cases Involving Inadmissible and Deportable Aliens (PDF, 140 KB).

USCIS may issue NTAs as described below based on denials of I-914/I-914A, Application for T Nonimmigrant Status; I-918/I-918A, Petition for U Nonimmigrant Status; I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant (Violence Against Women Act self-petitions and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status petitions); I-730, Refugee/Asylee Relative Petitions when the beneficiary is present in the US; I-929, Petition for Qualifying Family Member of a U-1 Nonimmigrant; and I-485 Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status (with the underlying form types listed above).

If applicants, beneficiaries, or self-petitioners who are denied are no longer in a period of authorized stay and do not depart the United States, USCIS may issue an NTA. USCIS will continue to send denial letters for these applications and petitions to ensure adequate notice regarding period of authorized stay, checking travel compliance, or validating departure from the United States.